Legacy Physical Therapy 2961 Dougherty Ferry Road Saint Louis, MO 63122
Call: 636-225-3649 Fax: 888-494-7074 Email: info@legacytherapystl.com

Posts Tagged ‘Legacy Physical Therapy’

Thank you for your generosity

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR HELPING US HELP the HOUSTON FLOOD VICTIMS!!

Many of you know that our receptionist Rosie is from the Houston area and she continues to have many family members and friends still living in Houston who were greatly affected by the flood. When we learned that Rosie and her husband, Norbert were going to be heading down to Houston to help out we immediately organized a supply drive at Legacy Physical Therapy. We were overwhelmed by the generosity of our patients, friends, and family.

Rosie and Norbert rented a minivan and filled it with all of the donated supplies to drive down to Houston. We were very impressed with the packing ability! Tetris has nothing on Norbert!

Minivan full of relief donations

Besides all the supply donations, Rosie and Norbert also received $1600 in cash donations. They used this money to buy Home Depot gift cards to help people start to rebuild.

Home Depot gift cards

Once down in Houston they partnered with a church local to Rosie’s family’s neighborhood to help distribute items. According to Rosie the church workers did an amazing job and went above and beyond to get items to needy families. Many families lost their cars in the flooding so church volunteers took it upon themselves to drive supplies to those in need.

Church distribution center

Rosie said she was glad that she was able to go down and help out. She wishes she could have done more because she knows that there is still so much to be done for these families to get back to their normal daily lives.

From all of us at Legacy Physical Therapy, we thank you from the bottom of our hearts for all of your generosity. It is awesome to see our community come together like this.

 

The Importance of Sleep

Do you need more zzzz’s? Or just better quality sleep??

If you’ve answered yes to the questions above then keep reading! Adequate sleep is essential for good health. Having healthy sleep habits is referred to as good sleep hygiene. If you would like to have better sleep hygiene resulting in improved sleep, then consider following some of these sleep practices below:

  • Go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day. Easier said than done, but studies show that consistent sleep and wake times will help to set your natural biological clock.
  • Set the environment to promote good sleep. Use your bed for only sleep and sexual activity to help train your body that if you are in bed, you should be sleeping. Keep the temperature of the room comfortable. Avoid eating or working in your bed. Lower the light and noise in the room. Use earplugs or eye masks if necessary to drown out uncontrollable noise or light.
  • Avoid using light emitting electronics at least 30 minutes prior to bedtime. The blue light coming from your television, tablet, phone, etc. can disrupt sleep by suppressing melatonin production.
  • Exercise earlier in the day. Moderate or vigorous exercise should be done at least 2-3 hours prior to bedtime. Exercise stimulates the body and brain, making it hard to fall asleep. Regular exercise has been shown to improve sleep, so keep moving, just preferably not in the few hours before bedtime.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol or smoking 3 to 4 hours before bedtime. Nicotine in cigarettes acts as a stimulant that can make it difficult to fall asleep. Some believe that alcohol will relax the body before bedtime and help with sleep. Actually, it can increase the number of times you wake up during the night and make you wake earlier.
  • Create a relaxing bedtime routine for yourself. A relaxing routine may include taking a warm bath, deep breathing, meditating, guided relaxation, doing some light reading, or even a yoga or stretching routine.
  • Avoid heavy meals and fluids. Excessively drinking or eating a large meal 2-3 hours before bedtime to allow plenty of time for your body to digest.
  • Avoid taking daytime naps. If you have to nap, limit the time you sleep during the day to 30 minutes so you are tired enough in the evening.
  • Most everyone has the occasional sleepless night, but if you consistently have problems sleeping after trying to improve your sleep hygiene, it is best to contact your doctor or health professional.

Here’s to you getting more restful sleep. We find that for many people pain issues and/or their bladder may be a disrupting factor during the night. If you find yourself unable to sleep secondary to pain or woken up several times a night because of your bladder then give us a call to find out more about how we may be able to help! 636-225-3649

Houston Flood Relief

Image from abcnews.com

Most of us probably know someone affected by the flooding in Houston. This natural disaster has hit particularly close to home here at Legacy Physical Therapy. Our amazing office coordinator, Rosie, is originally from Houston. She continues to have several friends and family members that live in the Houston area and have lost their homes and possessions to the flooding. We want to do something to help.

 

 

Rosie and her husband, Norbert, will be driving down to Houston on Friday September 8th to see family and help with the relief effort. They are are hoping to collect some donations to take with them.

We know that this is short notice. However, Legacy Physical Therapy will have donation boxes available at our office on Friday September 1st and Tuesday September 5th through Thursday September 8th. (We are closed for the Labor Day Holiday on Monday.)

Most Needed Items

  • Toiletries (toothpaste, toothbrush, deodorant….)
  • Cleaning Supplies
  • New socks/underwear
  • Non-perishable Food
  • Diapers &Wipes
  • Baby Food/ Formula
  • Sheets/Pillows
  • Cash (To be used to buy needed items)
  • Gift Cards (visa, mc, target, etc)

Please stop by during our business hours to drop off your flood relief donations for Rosie and Norbert to drive down to Houston. They will be renting an SUV to take supplies down. We want to make our impact as big as possible so consider sending along smaller, lighter items to fill up the SUV.

Legacy Physical Therapy
2961 Dougherty Ferry Road Suite 105
Saint Louis MO, 63122

  • Friday 9/1/17: 8:40am-4:20pm
  • Tuesday 9/5/17: 9:20am-7pm
  • Wednesday 9/6/17: 8am-6pm
  • Thursday 9/7/17: 8am-6pm

Thank you ahead of time for your donations and willingness to assist. Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of the families affected by the flooding.

Back to School with Essential Oils

School’s back in session, and that means homework, tests, sports, extra curriculars, and hustle and bustle added to life. Make life a little easier for you and your kiddos with “Back to School Wellness With Essential Oils.” Get some pointers on how to get restful sleep, more focus while studying, soothe achy muscles, and more!

Tuesday August 15th 7pm
at Legacy Physical Therapy

2961 Dougherty Ferry Road Suite 105 Saint Louis 63122
Register for this FREE event at 636-225-3649 info@legacytherapystl.com

Do You Have a Diastasis Recti?

Wow! We had an amazing response to our last blog post about rehabbing the mummy tummy. If you missed it, please check out our take on the importance of considering many factors when rehabilitating the postpartum core and/or diastasis recti, before reading on.

Diastasis recti is a separation of the abdominal muscles that commonly happens with pregnancy. For some women this separation heals back up without much effort after delivery. However, many women still have a diastasis recti months or years after delivery.

“How do I know if I have a diastasis recti?” This is a question that we get asked all the time. There is a simple test that you can perform yourself to determine if you have a separation of your abdominal muscles? Check out our quick how-to video.

How to Test for a Diastasis Recti?

So, did you perform the test? Do you have a separation of the abdominal muscles? If you had trouble telling if you had a diastasis recti, please contact us at Legacy Physical Therapy for a free discovery session to help you.

Or maybe you performed the test and you realized that you do have a diastasis recti. Now what? There are things that you can do to rehab your core whether you are 6 weeks, 6 months, or 6 years postpartum. Call us to discuss your findings with one of our experienced women’s health physical therapists. We are here to help.

 

Rehabbing the Mummy Tummy/ Diastasis Recti

Yesterday my Facebook feed was inundated with multiple shares of this NPR article titled, “Flattening The ‘Mummy Tummy’ With 1 Exercise, 10 Minutes A Day.” After all, with a title like that who wouldn’t want to click on the article and and learn what seems to be such a simple fix for diastasis recti. The trouble is that the “Fix” is never this simple.

While I appreciate the awareness this article is bringing to the topic of diastasis recti and recovery of the partpartum core, Diastasis recti is far more complex than any one single exercise for one single muscle. Diastasis recti is not just about the abs, but moreover is about full body alignment and optimal intra-abdominal pressure regulation. One of the things that I talk to my patients about all the time is that I can give them the world’s best abdominal exercise program to perform 10-20 minutes a day, but what they are doing the other 23 hours and 40-50 minutes makes a bigger difference to their diastasis recti.

Core Muscles

Core muscle function is so much more than static recruitment of a single abdominal muscle. Your transverse abdominal muscles, pelvic floor muscles, diaphragm, and deep back muscles form your deep core canister. They all work together to provide anticipatory stability. So few women realize that their breathing pattern is connected to their abdominal wall performance and their pelvic floor muscle function. My colleague, Julie Wiebe PT has a wonderful video about how all these muscles coordinate together on her webpage. Check it out. If we do not consider breathing pattern when rehabbing a diastasis recti, we are missing a big part of the picture. Chronic drawing in of the abdominal wall is not the answer! If we squeeze in the middle all the time, what are we doing to our pelvic floor down below… setting it up for issues down the road.

The research on diastasis recti is emerging and evolving. There is no way to prevent it during pregnancy by doing an exercise. It is a normal part of many women’s pregnancies. Don’t get me wrong, there are definitely things that you can do before and during your pregnancy to reduce your risk of a large diastasis recti and improve overall core function and support. However there other factors such as one’s genetics, overall tissue laxity, number and proximity in time of pregnancies, and singleton versus multiple pregnancy to name a few.

What’s a Woman to Do?

While this article is good to raise awareness, it barely scratches the surface of what is really needed to address the postpartum core rehabilitation. My best advice is to seek the care of a women’s health physical therapist to do a full assessment of core support system. At Legacy Physical Therapy, we see women all the time who think they are doing the right thing to rehab their core, but find that despite performing the exercises their symptoms are getting worse. If you cannot get to see a women’s health physical therapist, then please do your research when searching for solutions online. Below is a list of some of my favorite go to sites.

If you think that you are dealing with a diastasis recti or postpartum core weakness, we can help. Give us a call at 636-225-3649 to chat with one of our women’s health physical therapist to see how we can help. If you are not sure if you have a diastasis recti and want to be checked by a professional, call us to set up a free screening appointment. We are happy to help.

Fibromyalgia and Physical Therapy

Fibromyalgia is a clinical condition of unknown etiology characterized by chronic generalized body pain associated with fatigue and psychological distress. It typically presents in young to middle aged women and can result in sleep disturbance and significant impairment in activities of daily living.

Fibromyalgia trigger points

Fibromyalgia trigger points

While medical therapy for fibromyalgia exists and may to a limited extent be beneficial in managing pain, physical therapy plays a major role in treatment and rehabilitation. The aim of physical therapy is aimed at deconditioning and muscle weakness. There are different modalities of physical therapy aimed at treating different aspects of fibromyalgia.

1. Cadiovascular Fitness Training

Patients suffering from fibromyalgia are generally inactive and often become physically inactive over time. Exercise has shown benefits in long term management of fibromyalgia, with studies even showing an improvement in pain. In recent years, exercise remains one of the  most commonly recommended treatments.

Exercises are ideally low impact and could include Tai Chi, water exercise, and Qi Gong. Water based exercises seem to offer a small degree of advantage over exercises performed on land, but sometimes are not as convenient to perform. Based on patient function prior to initiating therapy, exercise programs can be tailored to the patient specifically.

2. Physical Therapy

Treatment is aimed at increasing overall muscle strength, and is aimed at reducing muscle weakness. Common advice and treatment may include:

  • Avoid muscle overloading- ie lifting heavy weights
  • Correcting body alignment
  • Muscle conditioning and stretching
  • Encouraging general activity

3. Muscle Massage

While this provides both psychological and physical relief to some extent, there is no strong evidence that it is useful as an individual treatment modality; rather it is better used in combination with other therapies.

4. Acupuncture

Randomized controlled trials have shown that acupuncture can provide significant improvement in pain reduction and a reduced perception of pain. However its long term benefits have not been adequately studied, and there is no clear guidance on how often treatment should be administered. It may be more beneficial as an adjunct therapy.

5. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS)

TENS is an electrical based pain reliever. It is more useful for localized pain, and hence its use for fibromyalgia may be limited. However it is an easy therapy that the patient can self administer at home.

Exercise and physical therapy are mainstay treatment options for fibromyalgia. Treatment options need to be tailored to the individual. With optimal therapy, patients can experience a significant improvement in symptoms.

Check Out Our Changes

If you have not already noticed, we wanted to point out that we have made some updates to our website to make it more user friendly. Now no matter what device you are using to view our website you should have an easier time viewing the content.

Key changes include:

  • Mobile friendly viewing
  • Easy sign-up for our newsletter
  • Easy access to our articles on our blog accessible off the home page
    • We will continue to have the Newsletter archive on our website for our newsletters from 2008-2015, but moving forward you can access the articles easily from our blog.
  • You can see any upcoming classes that we will be hosting on the right side of the screen.

We would love to hear from you on what you think of our changes. We want our website to be as helpful as possible for you, so if you want to see something different, let us know.

Curious About Essential Oils?

We are excited to start offering classes again at Legacy Physical Therapy. It has been a little while and we are glad to be back. Our first class back will be an introduction to essential oils.

Doterra Complete Offering

We hope that you can join us for this great basic essential oils class that will help explain what an essential oil is, what determines the quality of an essential oil, how they are used and some basic essential oil protocols for health and wellness. Class is Wednesday April 6th from 6:30pm-8pm at  Legacy Physical Therapy 2961 Dougherty Ferry Road Suite 105 63122. Register for this FREE event at 636-225-3649 or e-mail info@legacytherapystl.com

Do you have an idea for a class you would like us to host? Please let us know!

Brooke Goes to Washington

On Monday September 29 and Tuesday September 30, Dr. Brooke Kalisiak PT, DPT, WCS had a wonderful opportunity to represent the Private Practice Section of the American Physical Therapy Association at our Nation’s Capitol. She was among over 75 physical therapists business owners from across the country that  convened in Washington, DC September 29 – 30,2014 to lobby members of Congress. As part of the second annual event hosted by the Private Practice Section (PPS) of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Dr. Brooke Kalisiak met with the office of Senator Claire McCaskill, Senator Roy Blunt, and Representative Ann Wagner to discuss hard-hitting issues affecting the future of healthcare, patients, and physical therapy businesses.

Mo Contingency in Front of Capitol Building Brooke in Front of Capitol Building

Check out the full press release at: http://interact.stltoday.com/pr/local-news/PR100214120918820